Portrait of Trevor © Istvan Prem, used with permission
© Istvan Prem, used with permission

Trevor Barton was born on the south coast of England to a biker and a supermarket attendant. The conservative small town of his childhood was a place which, by the late 80’s, felt to him more like a miniature US State than a British place for stiffened upper lips. The town’s locals adored line dancing, his church shot its theology from the hip, fast food appeared; punk was out, and baseball-capped rave was in.

Shifting senses of nationhood, unusual theology and some family tragedy (his father became disabled, his mother died when he was sixteen) weren’t his only sources of childhood alienation and estrangement. For a few years as a teen he was sent to a military training corps for toughening up. As an attempt (almost certainly) to turn him straight, this failed spectacularly.

He studied at Bath (a place known for its emphasis on skills development during the study of arts subjects – and particularly known for its creative writing expertise). His main submission was a well-received script for a play. His multi-disciplinary MA dissertation (in 1998) explored why our culture takes interest in cyborgs using (among other things) feminist criticism and the latest in AI philosophy.

His love of technology, words, and creative industry led him to become a managing editor writing a mainstream UK web tech magazine after only his second career move. From there he stepped sideways into web development (still very new at the time) and sent sites live for global names like Nature and OUP. This got him bar-crawling Nashville and sharing sidewalks with alligators in Florida while on business trips to meet scientists.

He started writing novels in October 2016 and self-published a trilogy in just twelve months (something he doesn’t recommend). The first book (“Brobots”) hit the top 2% for LGBT Science Fiction on Amazon, and was longlisted for the Gaylactic Spectrum Award. The second (“Red Gods Sing”) featured in Geek Syndicate, Gay Star News, QueerSciFi.com and elsewhere. After the third (“Balance of Estubria”), a netgalley professional gave the entire series five stars. All three books were offered contracts from a US publisher, and are now with Beaten Track (in the UK) for an omnibus.

An associate of the SOA, he lives with his husband in Europe. An Internet Speculative Fiction Database (ISFDB) entry exists.